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EQUICUBE: Training Tool or Rider Torture Device?

Devaney Vazquez reports, from experience, that it’s a little bit of both.

Growing up, I was taught that “hate” was a strong word that shouldn’t be thrown around. But before I dive any further into my “hate” for this particular object, let me introduce you to it.

The EQUICUBE, an invention designed primarily for my demise:

equicube

This weighted, annoying block of rubber defeated me, and I still have hard feelings about it (and sore muscles).

The dreadful device was developed to improve your core strength, balance and posture in the saddle. It was invented by Linda Grandia, “a longtime dressage and eventing trainer with a passion for fitness,”  according to its website. Personally, I think she had my torture in mind when creating it.

How does the intolerable mechanism work?

Well, you add it to your grip of the reins. You have to keep it elevated enough to prevent it from touching the horse, but low enough to keep your shoulders and arms relaxed and in contact, and the logo should be parallel to the ground at all times.

equicube2-jpg

Here’s a demo video:

Yesterday, I was asked to ride with it during my dressage lesson and this is what happened:

It obligated me to near-perfect hand positioning.

It improved my riding posture and seat.

It eliminated my habit of leaning in while cantering.

It forced me to steer with my legs and core instead of my reins.

And, I ended the lesson feeling balanced and in contact with my horse — and tired.

Why is any of this bad? That’s the problem… it’s not!

I expressed so much hate for this skill-enhancing contraption throughout my lesson that now, I feel terrible about it. It’s like finding out that girl you thought you didn’t like is actually a lovely human being with a big heart that bakes dog-friendly treats for the homeless puppies at the Humane Society.

To make matters worse, EQUICUBE makes sure you remember how it made you feel.

How?

You wake up the next day feeling soreness in the tiniest of muscles in the most remote places of your body you didn’t even know existed.

I mean, who doesn’t love the feeling of being sore? It’s a constant reminder that you worked hard and exercised muscles you normally don’t target.

Now I’m left with that guilty feeling you sense after you hear, “I told you so,” from the one person you did not want to hear say it.

All I can say is, well-played EQUICUBE. You won this battle and my respect.


 

Check out HN staff writer Morgane Schmidt Gabriel’s review of the EQUICUBE here!

Read more of Devaney’s writing on her blog, 4Strides.

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